Dr. Muriel Marisa Katharina Bruchhage

Dr. Muriel Marisa Katharina Bruchhage
Name

Dr. Muriel Marisa Katharina Bruchhage

University

 

  • 2006 – 2008 Law interim degree; Free University Berlin, Germany
  • 2008 – 2011 Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, Université du Luxembourg, Luxemburg
  • 2011 – 2013 Master’s degree in Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway
  • 2013 – Present Registered Psychologist, Luxemburg
  • 2015 – 2018 PhD, Center for Neuroimaging Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience, King’s College London, United Kingdom
  • 2018 – Present Visiting Researcher, Center for Neuroimaging Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience, King’s College London, United Kingdom
  • 2018 – Present Post-Doctoral Research Associate, Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University and Hasbro Children’s Hospital, Rhode Island Hospital, USA

Research Summary

Dr. Bruchhage is a Post-doctoral Research Associate at Rhode Island Hospital and Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University, as well as a Visiting Researcher at King’s College London. Her research focuses on how brain structural and functional networks are facilitating learning mechanisms using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and state-of-the-art machine learning techniques. For this, she has explored typical brain plasticity in healthy developing children and adults, as well as in disorder and disease, ranging from Autism Spectrum Disorder to Alzheimer’s Disease.
Her recent work has explored how functional networks change with developing neurocognitive functions. These include research of evolving executive function and inhibitory control already in early childhood and how brain network connectivity changes after a developmental milestone has been reached. This work aims to shine light into the neural underpinnings of a child’s first steps, first words and other neurocognitive developments towards independency, paving the way for possible detection of early deviations indicative of early manifestations of disorders and disease. Her work has received international recognition, as indicated by considerable awards and prizes from within her field.